Social Sciences

Works relating to the social sciences (law, military, politics, economics, etc.).

The Southern Press Considers the Constitution

The Southern Press Considers the Constitution

85.00

28 pages. 23 cm.

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Miller, Francis Pickens (ed). THE SOUTHERN PRESS CONSIDERS THE CONSTITUTION. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1936. 28 pages. 23 cm. First edition. Southern Policy Papers No. 6.

Original printed wrappers, small rubber stamp of "The Southern Council on International Relations Box 568 Chapel Hill, N.C." on front cover. Shows light general wear. A very good copy.

This work prints editorial selections from major Southern newspapers that focus on the powers granted to the Supreme Court by U. S. Constitution.

Contents include:

A Letter to the Yankees by Jonathan Daniels, first published in the Raleigh, North Carolina, News & Observer on March 22, 1936

The Press and the Constitution, first published in the Anniston, Alabama, Star on January 12, 1936

Unconstitutional, first published in the Chattanooga, Tennessee, News on January 7, 1936

Death of the AAA, first published in the Chattanooga,Tennessee, Times on January 7, 1936

The Supreme Court Did Not "Usurp" Power, first published in the Little Rock, Arkansas, Gazette on January 12, 1936

Back to Despair, first published in the Raleigh, North Carolina, News & Observer on January 7, 1936

The Constitution, first published in the Louisville, Kentucky, Courier-Journal on January 8, 10, 13, 1936

On Reading the Opinions, first published in the Richmond, Virginia, Times-Dispatch on January 8, 1936.

The officers of the Southern Policy Committee and a list of Objectives of the Committee are found on the inside of the back cover. The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) was part of the New Deal. It reduced agricultural production by paying farmers subsidies not to plant on part of their land and to kill off excess livestock.

Its purpose was to reduce crop surplus and therefore effectively raise the value of crops. The money for these subsidies was generated through an exclusive tax on companies which processed farm products. The Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional.

 

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