History & Geography

United States history, including southeastern history, western history, and the American Civil War; European history, African history, and world history.

Ozanne's The South as it is (London, 1863)

Ozanne's The South as it is (London, 1863)

450.00

v, [1], 306 pages. 20 cm.

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Ozanne, T. D. The South as it is, or twenty-one years' experience in the Southern States of America. London: Saunders, Otley, and Co., [John Childs and Son, Printers], 1863. v, [1], 306 pages. 20 cm.

First edition. Recent quarter leather binding. Spine has five raised bands with title and decoration in gilt. There is one small rubber library stamp on the verso of the title page. Otherwise, interior is clean and unmarked. A very good example of this scarce and informative primary source.

Chapter titles are:

I. Introduction.

II. System of Slavery Considered.

III. The Resources of the South.

IV. The Form of Government - Commercial Policy - System of Finance.

V. Social Life in the South.

VI. The Southerner as a Statesman.

VII. Proclamation of President Lincoln.

VIII. The Religious Instruction of the Negroes.

IX. Black Colonization - Sundry Laws for the Protection of Slaves.

X. Emancipation of Slaves.

XI. Prosperity of the Two Sections, as Separate Nationalities, Considered.

XII. University of the South.

XIII. The Part which the Sects and Churches have taken in this Conflict.

XIV. Personal Narrative.

XV. Personal Narrative continued.

XVI. Personal Narrative Concluded.

COULTER: TRAVELS IN THE CONFEDERATE STATES, 359: "Most of this book is concerned with factual discussion of the South; only the last three of the sixteen chapters deal with the author's personal experiences. The Reverend Ozanne was an Englishman who became a resident of the South in 1841 as an Episcopal rector on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. In 1862 he decided to remove from this exposed region and settle for a time in the interior of the state, but after a few weeks at Terry, near Jackson, he determined to return to England. He took the New Orleans, Jackson, and Great Northern Railroad to a point near Lake Pontchartrain where the railway had been destroyed, crossed the lake on a leaky boat, continued on to New Orleans and waited there under the Butler regime for an opportunity to go by sea to New York. In September he sailed for England. This narrative gives an interesting picture of conditions in that part of the Confederacy which the author visited and especially of New Orleans under Butler."

HOWES O-174.

NEVINS: CIVIL WAR BOOKS A CRITICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY, Volume II, page 198. SABIN 58049.

WRIGHT: COMPENDIUM OF THE CONFEDERACY, Volume II, 242.

 

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